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Surfing Waves Made From A Flood In Hawaii Has Everyone Baffled…WTF

After heavy rains in Waimea Valley, some locals built their own wave machine by connecting a flooded river into the ocean. What exactly do you think will happen when you give young eager Hawaii surfers a week of rain, a tractor, and a flooded river mouth? You will get a whole lot of fun!

From time to time, during Hawaii’s rainy season on Oahu’s north shore, the river that runs through Waimea Valley floods, he ocean will send a heavy flow of water into the river mouth. Shame on you river because when you give these local Hawaiian surfers any type of a surface where they can surf, then you will be in deep trouble. These die-hard surfers will find a way to surf, even if their life depended on it. All these hardcore surfers need to do is rent a tractor and dig a deep enough trench at the mouth of the river, then you will have your own man-made surfing waves in a matter of hours. Now we can see why Hawaii still remains to be the happiest place to live in the world.

Via: JukinVideo

MORE EPIC SURFING & OCEAN VIDEOS FOR YOU TO SEE:
SEE ALSO: Guy Surfs The World’s Biggest Wave Ever Recorded Caught On Live Video.
SEE ALSO: Live Footage Of Pro Surfer Mick Fanning Attacked By Shark During Competition.
SEE ALSO: A Shark Is headed In This Guy’s Direction And The Inevitable Happens…OMG!
SEE ALSO: Daredevil Robbie Maddison Takes On Giant Tahitian Wave On A Dirt Bike…HUH?

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